Programme

The AI for Good programme is designed to identify practical applications of AI to advance the sustainable development goals, and scale those solutions for global impact.

AI/ML expert workshop

Co-chairs: KLAUS-ROBERT MÜLLER Professor, Machine Learning Group, Technical University Berlin KAMALIKA CHAUDHURI, Assistant Professor, University of California at San Diego MASASHI SUGIYAMA, Director, RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project; Professor, University of Tokyo
04 May
09:00 - 17:15
InterContinental Geneva
Chemin du Petit-Saconnex 7-9, 1209 Genève
Invitation only, Learn

Environment

In the past decade, environmental change and its devastating consequences have intensified as temperatures, sea and pollution levels rose; record-breaking hurricanes, floods and wildfires devastated communities and displaced up to 300 million people[1]; and melting ice caps, desertification, deforestation and soil degradation led to significant deterioration of ecosystems and biodiversity loss, including 20% decline in native plant and animal life[2]. According to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, humanity has the next decade to avoid irreversible and catastrophic environmental change[3]. Many factors or drivers are responsible for this ongoing change. Human-induced climate change is itself considered a significant independent driver of environmental change. Other prominent factors include pressures from population growth, such as, increased need for agricultural lands, food production and waste, energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, air and water pollution, and urbanization. To avoid the worst outcomes, unprecedented changes are needed in human made systems, such as food systems, economic markets, energy production and consumption, and many others.[4] While these required changes might be unprecedented, a sustainable future is still possible, where we equally prioritize environmental well-being with human well-being. This means a world where different human-made systems must come to operate within ecological and planetary boundaries. Our global community can leverage our collective capacity to leverage AI towards achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 by ensuring that the development and deployment of climate change solutions meet our targets to: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts (SDG 13) Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development (SDG 14), and Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss (SDG 15). The 2020 AI for Good Global Summit is the call to action for all stakeholders to come together and identify, adopt and execute on environmentally-focused projects that are considerate to our society and the world we live in. Join us in exploring, identifying, incentivizing, and realizing breakthroughs to protect and nourish the environment and our planet. Help us create this better future where humanity thrives together with the environment and all other forms of life.
04 May
09:00 - 16:00
Room Nyon
CVV
Breakthrough Track, Build, Invitation only
Environment

Food

Over 800 million people suffer from hunger and 3 billion from nutrient deficiencies[1]. More than 200 million children are either stunted or wasted[2], and nearly half of all child deaths under the age of 5 are due to undernutrition[3]. Obesity alone costs $2 trillion dollars annually.[4] It is often the poorest in societies across the world who work in the food sector, with a total of 2.5 billion people globally and 70% of employment in developing countries dependent on the food and agriculture sectors for their livelihoods.[5] Food systems are by far the largest contributor to environmental degradation, accounting for 35% of global greenhouse gas emissions[6] and 70% of water withdrawal[7], while constituting a leading cause of deforestation, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. To eradicate hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture by 2030 (SDG 2), food systems must be radically transformed. Specifically, we must work to increase the consumption and production of healthier food, create inclusive food supply chains, and manage food systems within environmental limits. Addressing these three areas will help us achieve a better future for food systems where: people around the world consume healthy and nutritious foods that are affordable, sufficient, and diverse; improved food literacy supports healthier dietary choices; food system policies incentivize the production of healthier crops; inclusive food systems enable enhanced livelihoods and promote fair economic opportunities; and food systems mitigate environmental decline and regenerate environmental systems. The scale and urgency of this necessary transformation demands audacious and impactful breakthroughs. One such breakthrough is to leverage Artificial Intelligence that is already used in the agriculture and all food sectors and value chain to create precise nutrient content for specific consumers, improve soil health, detect pests and diseases, and increase efficiency and safety in primary production, supply chains, and retail, among others. Our global community can leverage our collective capacity to leverage AI towards achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 by ensuring that the development and deployment of smart food systems solutions meet our targets for zero hunger while caring for the planet that serves us all, both above and below water. The 2020 AI for Good Global Summit is the call to action for all stakeholders to come together and identify, adopt and execute on food projects that are considerate to our society and the world we live in. Join us in creating a better future for all of humanity and our planet. A future where all people are free from hunger, malnutrition, and other forms of suffering due to food systems, and a future not at the expense of the environment and all other life forms.
04 May
09:00 - 16:00
Room Lausanne
CVV
Breakthrough Track, Invitation only
Food

Gender

Data is the basic building block of the modern world. It informs our institutions, shapes our cities, determines how our products are made, and guides policymakers and political systems. For centuries, men have designed the world in their own image: using their worldview, physiology, habits, and priorities as the default. These biases are now embedded in society and the effects that this ‘unthinking’ has on 50 percent of our population is shocking.[1] The world as we know it has been shaped using an average 5’9”, 155 Ib., 45 year-old male as a representation for the entire human population.[2] The implications of this assumption range from small inconveniences to matters of life and death. From Google voice recognition software being 70 percent less likely to recognize female voices[3] to 17 percent of women being more at risk of death and 47 percent more likely to be seriously injured in a car crash, it’s clear that designing the world for the average man has had extreme consequences.[4] These deadly outcomes extend to fields like healthcare, where scientific rigor is supposedly prioritized. In doctor’s offices around the world, women with heart disease are misdiagnosed up to 50% more often because standards of care were made using male subjects.[5] Even women who risk their lives to protect us are at risk: 66% of protective gear does not fit women, because dust, hazard and eye masks were designed for the standard male face size and shape.[6] Whether it be car safety and design, protective gear and uniforms, pharmaceutical drug design, or basic comfort in public spaces, the vast majority of the world we live in today is built and tested with data from men. Though these design flaws and their consequences were unintended, correcting them is essential for the creation of a more equitable world (SDG 5). As artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning replace manual design and human oversight, society gains efficiency. However, the inputs used to determine these machine-made choices rely on flawed data that lacks critical information about female preferences, behaviors, and needs. Embedded in AI technology, the problems that result from a lack of data about women will be amplified at an alarming rate and inform all aspects of the future world. Incomplete or skewed training datasets, bias in labels used for training, and bias introduced in the features and modeling techniques themselves contribute to inaccurate gender data.[7] AI is learning gender bias from humans.[8] Biased data leads to biased insights, biased algorithms, biased solutions and policies, and ultimately a biased world that is designed only to meet the needs of the few. Join us in our efforts to prevent a cycle of algorithmic bias and enable an equitable future for humanity. We believe there is a technological solution to the missing data problem and incentivizing the crowd to investigate the ways in which AI and machine learning can create a future in which unbiased insights that tell the story of all humanity —not just a subset of it — is the way to achieve it. Together we can enable people to create solutions, design products and services, allocate resources, implement policies, and make decisions that are good for everyone.
04 May
09:00 - 16:00
Room Vevey
CVV
Breakthrough Track, Build, Invitation only
Diversity

2020 IEEE / ITU International Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Good

Artificial Intelligence (AI) offers society and the business-world novel and radically different approaches to knowledge discovery, learning, problem-solving, and decision making. Based on intelligent computing technologies that empower machines to observe, listen, and learn beyond the typical capabilities of humans, AI facilitates business decision making by offering real-time models with enhanced accuracy and efficiencies. Applications are not limited to business and include smart cities and their governance, so that socio-economic benefits are shared by the many and not just the few. The IEEE / ITU International Conference on Artificial Intelligence for Good (AI4G 2020) brings together international researchers, academics and practitioners to exchange views, share ideas and explore future research themes in order to meet current challenges and promote positive social change in relation to the use of AI for Good. The conference provides attendees with the opportunity to present and discuss the findings of current research relating to intelligent computing technologies – and how they can be employed to deliver positive, ethical and scalable outcomes for society at large. The AI4G 2020 conference (http://2020.ai4g.ieee-tems.org) will be held in conjunction with the ITU AI for Good Global Summit (https://aiforgood.itu.int/)and conference attendees from ITU Members or Member States will enjoy full access to all sessions of the Global Summit where world-leading experts in AI will be sharing their personal insights into practical applications of AI. The conference will be held at ITU premises in Geneva. We welcome papers covering all aspects of artificial intelligence, with major topics including but not limited to: – Digital Cooperation – Technology Advancements in AI – Managing and Implementing AI Projects – AI for sustainable development such as in e.g. Smart Cities – Women and AI – Responsible and Ethical Approaches to AI –Business models for AI –Social Inclusion and AI, including Inclusive Intelligence and Intelligence Amplification –Safety in AI –Ethically-driven robotics and automation –AI for Good Policies and Standards –AI in Practice for e.g. smart mobility, precision agriculture, smart grids, Industry 4.0, sharing economy, humanitarian demining, personalized healthcare, learning, and environment monitoring. Paper submissions should clearly explain and highlight how the research topic affects the management and operation of businesses, either in the public or private sector. We are interested in illustrative case studies of AI in practice, empirical papers, and literature reviews that help set the research agenda for AI for social Good. Papers should explain how they help accelerate the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, identifying the practicality and scalability of any proposed solution, particularly up to 2030. All accepted papers presented at the AI4G conference will be published in the conference proceedings and will be submitted for publication in the IEEE Xplore Digital Library, and indexed by multiple abstract indexing companies including Scopus. There will be an opportunity for selected best papers to publish an extended version of the conference paper in Special Issues of the IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management and the ITU Journal: ICT Discoveries. Selected papers will have the opportunity to be published in an issue of our flagship journals. This would include research articles suitable for our journal IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management (IEEE TEM) and practical and case study articles suitable for our journal of practice, the IEEE Engineering Management Review (IEEE EMR). All papers would have to be suitably expanded beyond the conference paper for IEEE TEM. IEEE EMR submissions would need to be edited, targeted and formatted for one of three types of papers published by IEEE EMR. Each paper will be subject to the corresponding journal’s rigorous peer-review process. Currently, the IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management is running a Special Issue entitled “Technology for Social Good,” with as guest editors Prof. Chunguang Bai and Prof. Joseph Sarkis; selected best papers will be invited for further development and submission to this issue. Further details can be found soon at: https://www.ieee-tems.org/call-for-papers/. The IEEE TEMS has also launched a new Special Interest Group (SIG) on “Technology for Good” and this event is included in the calendar of activities for this new SIG (https://www.ieee-tems.org/tems-technical-activity-committees/), for which all those interested are invited to join. Important Dates: Paper Submission Due: 17 February 2020 Notification of Acceptance: 27 March 2020 Author Registration Due: 17 April 2020 Normal Registration: 24 April 2020 Paper submission : All papers must be submitted electronically: https://edas.info/N26137 • Full papers describing original research. Suggested size is seven pages; papers up to seven pages will be accepted but at an extra charge. • Extended abstracts describing emerging results of new research areas or relevant topics from an industrial point of view, not to exceed two pages. We solicit two types of paper submissions. Authors, please go to https://www.ieee.org/ conferences/publishing/templates.html for the IEEE conference paper templates, and take notice that standard a total 8 pages including references and bios is applicable, with a max of 10 pages and 100 EUR for each extra page. Papers will be fully peer-reviewed. If the paper is accepted and presented, it will be included in the conference proceedings and be submitted to the Xplore Digital Library. IEEE takes the protection of intellectual property very seriously. All submissions will be screened for plagiarism using iThenticate. How to submit: All papers must be submitted in PDF and US letter format. Submitted papers must conform to the IEEE formatting guidelines as specified in these templates (Word Template, LaTeX package). All papers must be submitted electronically: https://edas.info/N26137
04 May
09:00 - 17:15
Invitation only, Learn

Environment

In the past decade, environmental change and its devastating consequences have intensified as temperatures, sea and pollution levels rose; record-breaking hurricanes, floods and wildfires devastated communities and displaced up to 300 million people[1]; and melting ice caps, desertification, deforestation and soil degradation led to significant deterioration of ecosystems and biodiversity loss, including 20% decline in native plant and animal life[2]. According to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, humanity has the next decade to avoid irreversible and catastrophic environmental change[3]. Many factors or drivers are responsible for this ongoing change. Human-induced climate change is itself considered a significant independent driver of environmental change. Other prominent factors include pressures from population growth, such as, increased need for agricultural lands, food production and waste, energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, air and water pollution, and urbanization. To avoid the worst outcomes, unprecedented changes are needed in human made systems, such as food systems, economic markets, energy production and consumption, and many others.[4] While these required changes might be unprecedented, a sustainable future is still possible, where we equally prioritize environmental well-being with human well-being. This means a world where different human-made systems must come to operate within ecological and planetary boundaries. Our global community can leverage our collective capacity to leverage AI towards achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 by ensuring that the development and deployment of climate change solutions meet our targets to: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts (SDG 13) Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development (SDG 14), and Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss (SDG 15). The 2020 AI for Good Global Summit is the call to action for all stakeholders to come together and identify, adopt and execute on environmentally-focused projects that are considerate to our society and the world we live in. Join us in exploring, identifying, incentivizing, and realizing breakthroughs to protect and nourish the environment and our planet. Help us create this better future where humanity thrives together with the environment and all other forms of life.
05 May
11:00 - 12:15
Room 1+2
Breakthrough Track, Build
Environment

Food

Over 800 million people suffer from hunger and 3 billion from nutrient deficiencies[1]. More than 200 million children are either stunted or wasted[2], and nearly half of all child deaths under the age of 5 are due to undernutrition[3]. Obesity alone costs $2 trillion dollars annually.[4] It is often the poorest in societies across the world who work in the food sector, with a total of 2.5 billion people globally and 70% of employment in developing countries dependent on the food and agriculture sectors for their livelihoods.[5] Food systems are by far the largest contributor to environmental degradation, accounting for 35% of global greenhouse gas emissions[6] and 70% of water withdrawal[7], while constituting a leading cause of deforestation, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. To eradicate hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture by 2030 (SDG 2), food systems must be radically transformed. Specifically, we must work to increase the consumption and production of healthier food, create inclusive food supply chains, and manage food systems within environmental limits. Addressing these three areas will help us achieve a better future for food systems where: people around the world consume healthy and nutritious foods that are affordable, sufficient, and diverse; improved food literacy supports healthier dietary choices; food system policies incentivize the production of healthier crops; inclusive food systems enable enhanced livelihoods and promote fair economic opportunities; and food systems mitigate environmental decline and regenerate environmental systems. The scale and urgency of this necessary transformation demands audacious and impactful breakthroughs. One such breakthrough is to leverage Artificial Intelligence that is already used in the agriculture and all food sectors and value chain to create precise nutrient content for specific consumers, improve soil health, detect pests and diseases, and increase efficiency and safety in primary production, supply chains, and retail, among others. Our global community can leverage our collective capacity to leverage AI towards achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 by ensuring that the development and deployment of smart food systems solutions meet our targets for zero hunger while caring for the planet that serves us all, both above and below water. The 2020 AI for Good Global Summit is the call to action for all stakeholders to come together and identify, adopt and execute on food projects that are considerate to our society and the world we live in. Join us in creating a better future for all of humanity and our planet. A future where all people are free from hunger, malnutrition, and other forms of suffering due to food systems, and a future not at the expense of the environment and all other life forms.
05 May
14:00 - 15:15
Room 1+2
Breakthrough Track, Build
Food

Gender

Data is the basic building block of the modern world. It informs our institutions, shapes our cities, determines how our products are made, and guides policymakers and political systems. For centuries, men have designed the world in their own image: using their worldview, physiology, habits, and priorities as the default. These biases are now embedded in society and the effects that this ‘unthinking’ has on 50 percent of our population is shocking.[1] The world as we know it has been shaped using an average 5’9”, 155 Ib., 45 year-old male as a representation for the entire human population.[2] The implications of this assumption range from small inconveniences to matters of life and death. From Google voice recognition software being 70 percent less likely to recognize female voices[3] to 17 percent of women being more at risk of death and 47 percent more likely to be seriously injured in a car crash, it’s clear that designing the world for the average man has had extreme consequences.[4] These deadly outcomes extend to fields like healthcare, where scientific rigor is supposedly prioritized. In doctor’s offices around the world, women with heart disease are misdiagnosed up to 50% more often because standards of care were made using male subjects.[5] Even women who risk their lives to protect us are at risk: 66% of protective gear does not fit women, because dust, hazard and eye masks were designed for the standard male face size and shape.[6] Whether it be car safety and design, protective gear and uniforms, pharmaceutical drug design, or basic comfort in public spaces, the vast majority of the world we live in today is built and tested with data from men. Though these design flaws and their consequences were unintended, correcting them is essential for the creation of a more equitable world (SDG 5). As artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning replace manual design and human oversight, society gains efficiency. However, the inputs used to determine these machine-made choices rely on flawed data that lacks critical information about female preferences, behaviors, and needs. Embedded in AI technology, the problems that result from a lack of data about women will be amplified at an alarming rate and inform all aspects of the future world. Incomplete or skewed training datasets, bias in labels used for training, and bias introduced in the features and modeling techniques themselves contribute to inaccurate gender data.[7] AI is learning gender bias from humans.[8] Biased data leads to biased insights, biased algorithms, biased solutions and policies, and ultimately a biased world that is designed only to meet the needs of the few. Join us in our efforts to prevent a cycle of algorithmic bias and enable an equitable future for humanity. We believe there is a technological solution to the missing data problem and incentivizing the crowd to investigate the ways in which AI and machine learning can create a future in which unbiased insights that tell the story of all humanity —not just a subset of it — is the way to achieve it. Together we can enable people to create solutions, design products and services, allocate resources, implement policies, and make decisions that are good for everyone.
05 May
16:00 - 17:15
Room 1+2
ANOUSHEH ANSARI, HANS KEIRSTEAD
Breakthrough Track, Build
Diversity

Gender

Identify and create gender inclusive AI data sets and applications and tools that support gender equality and empower all women and girls
06 May
09:00 - 17:15
Room 4
Level 0, CICG
Build
Diversity

Food

Identify AI projects and solutions for agriculture, food supply and food safety Identify main transformational opportunities that AI can bring to agriculture and the associated challenges in its adoption
06 May
09:00 - 17:15
Room 5+6
Breakthrough Track, Build
Food

Environment

Aim • Identify AI solutions to meet existing challenges related to climate change and energy efficiency • Explore the positive opportunities offered by these applications for sustainable development
06 May
09:00 - 17:15
Room 3
Level 0, CICG
Breakthrough Track, Build
Environment

AI to preserve cultural heritage

The cultural heritage sector is experiencing a digital revolution driven by the growing adoption of artificial intelligence and machine-learning algorithms. Despite the strong drive and need to explore and adopt AI tools to interrogate these fields, there are major associated challenges that need to be addressed.  The AI and the Preservation of Culture Solutions track intends to facilitate the matchmaking of these ideas, challenges and AI solutions among the participating stakeholders. This track will accommodate AI and data science experts and academics, cultural heritage institutions coming from various countries, and experts with relevant practical use cases, all with the overarching goal of advancing the area of artificial intelligence for culture and historical heritage preservation.
06 May
09:00 - 12:15
Room 2
Level 0, CICG
MIGUEL RODRIGUES, WOLFGANG VICTOR YARLOTT
Learn, Solution track
Culture

AI & Humanizing Health

AI can improve the quality of affordable services, optimize the distribution of resources in underdeveloped and understaffed communities and create inclusive and responsive solutions for healthcare, diagnosis, triage or treatment decisions. However, it is not enough to deploy these solutions in the wild. We must also examine how these applications can be used responsibly and in the context of meeting our goals of having universal health coverage for all. The 2018 AI for Good Global Summit created the ITU/WHO Focus Group on AI 4 Health, which aims to benchmark AI models in health diagnostics. This year’s AI for Health Solution track will extend this work towards Universal Health Coverage in 2030 and Good Health and Well-Being in general, by identifying new ways in which AI can benefit health.
06 May
09:00 - 12:15
Room 1
Level 1, CICG
VICKI HANSON, SHWETAK PATEL
Learn, Solution track
Health and well-being

AI & Digital Trust

The advent of the digital society revolutionized how we communicate information with a scale and speed like never before, and artificial intelligence (AI) is now being adopted to further refine the quality of life, services and communication pathways afforded to digital citizens. However, just as these technologies enable better communication and representation so too can they negatively impact our digital and human rights.  This year's AI and Digital Trust Solutions track will establish a concrete, inclusive and actionable discussion on how AI-enabled solutions can help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals for peaceful, well-informed sustainable communities, the advancement of public access to truthful information, and the protection of fundamental freedoms as related to the digital society.
06 May
14:00 - 17:15
Room 2
Level 0, CICG
ANDREW TSONCHEV
Learn, Solution track
Misinformation

Future of safe & smart mobility

Towards zero emissions, zero deaths and zero left behind The future of smart mobility is more than just the progression and mainstreaming of semi -and fully-autonomous transport systems in the market. It is also about examining how AI technologies can help reduce emissions, increase road safety, increase mobility and enable access to affordable transportation for all.  This year's The Future of Smart Mobility Solution track will establish a concrete, inclusive and actionable discussion on how AI-enabled solutions can help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals for improving in-transit traffic safety, developing energy-/environment-efficient vehicles, transportation systems and infrastructure and providing inclusive and accessible mobility opportunities for all.  
06 May
14:00 - 17:15
Room 1
Level 1, CICG
LUCAS DI GRASSI, BRYN BALCOMBE
Learn, Solution track
Smart mobility

Keynote & Food pitches

Identify AI projects and solutions for agriculture, food supply and food safety Identify main transformational opportunities that AI can bring to agriculture and the associated challenges in its adoption
07 May
14:00 - 15:15
Room 1+2
Keynote, Learn

National AI strategies

Panel bringing together the experts responsible for developing national AI strategies to have deep AI conversations cantered around their AI strategies and also how they might implement the breakthrough projects (in doing so discuss the potential, opportunities, challenges, bottleneck, etc. related to implementing such projects).
08 May
09:00 - 10:15
Room 2
Level 0, CICG
Learn

AI & Justice

Governments are exploring how artificial intelligence (AI) enables fairer and more accountable institutions and access to justice for all. However, the race to capture value from the technology can exacerbate existing judicial challenges as well as disenfranchise non-digital natives and underserved communities. This year's AI and Justice Solution track will establish a concrete, inclusive and actionable discussion on how AI-enabled solutions can help achieve the 16th Sustainable Development Goal to uphold peace, justice and strong institutions for all.
08 May
16:00 - 17:15
Room 2
Level 0, CICG
L. SONG RICHARDSON
Learn, Solution track
Justice
No event found!